Samsung Galaxy S10+ Exynos Review

11 March 2019, 08:43:11

Samsung Galaxy S10+ Exynos Review
Get a Samsung Galaxy S10 Duos or Galaxy S10+ Duos (Exynos and Snapdragon versions available) at a promotional price from Etoren.com. Tax/duties are included for selected countries.

$30 off for Samsung Galaxy S10 Duos and Galaxy S10+ Duos with the following coupons:
  • OFF30RU for Russia buyers
  • OFF30EU for EU buyers
  • OFF30UK for UK buyers
  • OFF30WW for the rest of the world

OS, UI, and apps

Samsung Galaxy S10+ runs on Android 9 Pie with One UI 1.1 on top. The new overlay looks more colourful and objects are more rounded and larger. There are plenty of elements that have been redesigned. Starting with the Lock screen, the time and date widget are now placed in the top left corner. You get several options for customizing it, including the number of notifications appearing on this screen and the application shortcuts you'd prefer to be shown there. The latter is a first for a Galaxy S device. The Home screen is the first to demonstrate the new icon design and desktop layout. Compared to Samsung Experience, it has two rows of apps, the bottom one being docked, and a second desktop with an additional row of favourite applications above the docked one. A swipe up opens the list of all apps and folders but you can change that from the Home screen settings. The navigation buttons have been redesigned as well but customizations are limited. However, you do have the option to replace the on-screen navigation bar with gestures.

A swipe to the right from the Home Screen opens the Bixby screen which you can customize to your preferences. Desktop shortcuts continue to be supported. The only difference with how they're listed is the colour of the options - green now, blue on Samsung Experience. The Task Manager is totally different and incorporated the Android 9 Pie paradigms. It tiles the apps horizontally and from the icon on top of each one you get access to a list of options - for locking/unlocking an app, open in split screen, app info, open in a pop-up window. The latter allows you to minimize this screen to the size of the app's icon, to decrease the pop-up window opacity, etc. Desktop shortcuts are supported and except for the colour of the options, nothing else has been changed. The Edge Panels reflect the new curvier and more colourful design paradigm, otherwise, their functionality remains almost unchanged.
The Notification cards and Quick Settings shade have strongly curved corners. The font remains the same but the icons are larger and re-designed. From the Quick Settings, you can sun Samsung Kids Home which allows you to set a safe environment for your kids in which they can learn through play. The Volume shade has all four corners curved and contains four sliders plus a toggle for using the Volume key for media. The Power off menu contains three options: power off, restart, emergency mode. The Widgets menu follows the new curvier design paradigm and lists the Themes and Wallpapers as two separate menus. The Home Screen settings are increased with one option - Lock Home Screen layout. All else is the same, including the Home Screen layout, Home Screen and app grids, etc.
Samsung has further optimized the number of pre-installed apps on the new Galaxy S devices. You still get the usual Samsung, Google and Microsoft folders with corresponding applications. The Samsung folder contains the Phone, Messenger, Smart Things, Voice Recorder, Email, My Files, Internet (browser), Samsung Health, Galaxy Wearable. Outside the folder, there are the Galaxy Store, Samsung Members, Samsung Notes. The Google folder includes Chrome, Drive, Duo, Gmail, Google Now, Maps, Photos, YouTube. Play Music and Play Store are positioned outside this folder. The rest of the standard applications that everyone would expect to find on the device includes Calendar, Clock, Calculator, Gallery, Contacts, Camera. Finally, there are the Game Mode, Spotify and Facebook. The latter cannot be uninstalled.

The three tabs on the Phone app are now placed at the bottom of the screen and are changed - Keypad, Recents, Contacts. The Places tab is gone. The Contacts and Messenger are almost unchanged. The Calculator has been re-designed as well. The History tab is now simply an icon and the list includes a tab for the metric conversion. The calendar has undergone several minor changes (server corners), a smaller and monochrome name of the month, etc. The Clock app also shows the tabs at its bottom, unlike previous versions. The My Files application is almost unchanged except for the rounded corners and more colourful appearance. The Voice Recorder offers stereo recording, which works perfectly and you can make standard recordings, interview-style ones and speech-to-text conversions. The latter is especially useful for notes. Speaking of notes, the app with the same name is largely unchanged and supports typing, handwriting and pen input. Of course, there's the Game Launcher from where you can manage better your device during playing games and optimize performance in this regard. From the Sound settings, there's a special toggle for Dolby Atmos sound during gameplay. There are other familiar apps as well such as Samsung Health, Samsung Members and Smart-Things.

Settings Menu

At first sight, because of the new design, the Settings menu might look overwhelming, but it is actually even more streamlined compared to the Samsung Experience overlay installed on the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S9. The menus are restructured a bit and more advanced features a directly placed deeper with the most important options available a click away. As long as it concerns the design, each main group of settings looks like a card with strongly curved four corners and colourful icons designating the separate menu groups. The search bar is gone and appears only after you tap on the magnifier icon on top of the list. It is adjoined by an icon that prompts you to log in with your Samsung and/or Google account. In terms of architecture, it is almost the same as in the previous generations UIs only a few of the menus have swapped places. The first group of settings is the usual Connections one and contains the options for the Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Phone visibility, NFC and Payment, Airplane mode, Mobile networks, Data usage, SIM cards manager and Mobile hotspot and tethering. The additional connectivity options include Nearby devices scanning toggle, Printing, VPN, Private DNS, Ethernet, Download booster toggle (uses Wi-Fi and mobile internet simultaneously to download faster from Play Store and Galaxy Store), MirrorLink. The latter allows you to mirror your smartphone's screen on your car's display so you can keep your hands on the wheel.

The second group is called Sounds and vibration. It includes three sound modes (sound, vibrate, mute), the default volume key control actions, volume sliders, vibration intensity, ringtones, vibration patterns, notification sounds, DND, system and key-tap sounds. The various options have only changed places compared to the previous Samsung UI but all are there. Another change here is that not all options are listed in one place. The Advanced and System sounds are separated. The Advanced includes the sound quality and effects settings along with the separate app sound settings. More about this - in the Audio section of this review. The DND mode has moved to the next menu - Notifications, which also adds further Status bar settings to the usual app icon badges and app-specific notification settings. The status bar options are simple. You can toggle on/off the battery percentage and choose whether to see the last 3 notifications only or all of them.

The Display settings contain all the usual features you're already familiar with such as the brightness level bar, auto brightness toggle and blue light filter settings, Font size and style, screen zoom and resolution, list of apps supporting full-screen mode. However, in One UI you also get a Night Mode which can be scheduled and manually adjusted. From this menu, you can also manage the Edge screen and panels, switch on the Easy mode for simpler UI when needed, manage the navigation bar and screen saver options. In addition to that, you get a touch sensitivity toggle for improving the touch sensitivity of the display when you're using it with screen protectors. The screen modes have been entirely changed and from four in Samsung Experience, they are now down to two on One UI. The default mode is dubbed Natural and is calibrated for sRGB content viewing. The second mode is called Vivid and is calibrated for spaces larger than 100% DCI-P3. With this mode on, the brightness jumps a bit and the colours are visibly punchier. The Home screen settings which appear on the Widgets menu are available here as well.
Once you set up a screen lock from the Lock Screen settings, you can choose to switch on/off the notifications on the Lock Screen and the Always on Display, you can adjust the style in which they appear and hide/show notification content. You can also enable/disable the AOD from here. The rest of the Lock Screen options include Smart Lock features, a choice of Clock styles and FaceWidgets, show contact information and customize the app shortcuts that appear on the Lock Screen. There are Smart Lock options as well as secure lock settings and faster recognition features such as "lift to wake", brighten screen for better facial recognition in poorly lit environments, etc. Biometrics and Security is the seventh group of settings. From here, you can set up and manage your face ID and fingerprint ID(s) and set your biometrics preferences. The rest of the options include the standard security and privacy settings such as Google Play Protect, Find my device, Security update, Samsung Pass, Secure Folder, app permissions, etc. The Secure Folder is an integral part of these settings and very much resembles the second space feature on other UIs. The information stored in it can be unlocked differently from the Lock screen. It can store second installations of apps you already have installed on the device, and for example have different chats, Facebook, and Google accounts. Moreover, you can hide the Secure Folder icon, so no one would expect you have such a secret space.
The rest of the settings continue with the Accounts and backup menu, which contains options for the Samsung Cloud, Samsung and Google accounts management, Backup and restore, Smart Switch. The latter provides an easier way to transfer the data from your old device via a USB cable or wirelessly. The Google group of settings is up next followed by the Advanced Features - the tenth group of settings. One UI adds to this group Bixby Routines and Bixby Key options. For the first time after the appearance of the dedicated Bixby key, you get the option to customize it. You can press once the key to start Bixby and twice to open an app or run a short command. Things can go vice versa as well - a single press on the key for an app/command and double press for starting Bixby. The rest of the advanced features include Smart pop-up view (the recent notifications appear as icons that can be expanded in pop-up view), Smart capture, Direct share for sharing content with specific people directly from the sharing panel within an app, Reduce animations, Game launcher, Dual messenger (allows you to use two separate accounts for one and the same app such as Facebook, for example), Video enhancer and Send SOS messages. Most of the previous advanced features are now grouped in a Motion and gestures sub-menu, which includes the Smart Stay feature (allows your phone to stay awake while you're looking at it by using the front camera to detect your face), lift to wake, double tap to wake, smart alert, easy mute, one-handed mode, palm swipe to capture, swipe to call or send messages.
A first for a Samsung smartphone is the Digital Wellbeing menu. It provides data on how long you have used the apps on the device and allows you to set time limiters to reduce the time spent on the screen. You can also follow up the number of unlocks and notifications, manage the notifications and switch on the wind-down toggle, which either blocks notifications or changes the screen to greyscale. Device Care is the following group of settings. It gives you the current status of your device with options to optimise it. One UI offers only 4 options with this group down from 5 because the Performance mode has been removed. The rest of the options include monitoring and management of the battery, storage, memory and security. The latter is added by McAfee's security software and is disabled by default. The Apps group of settings comes next and offers the usual list of default applications, options for managing each one of them, application permissions and special access settings.

The General management menu is quite basic and its three main features are the Language and input, Date and time, and Reset settings. The Language and input sub-menu allows you to add more than one primary language, use predictive text, auto spell check, auto capitalise, auto spacing and punctuating features, but it also allows you a great deal of customisation. You can resize the keyboard and change its layout by excluding/adding number keys and adding more characters to it. The key-tap feedback can be either a sound, a vibration, or both. There's an Autofill service as well available with Samsung Pass.

The Accessibility group of settings comes next and in terms of structure it has been quite optimized and does not look as overwhelming as it was on Samsung Experience. It adds the Screen Reader options from where you have to activate and set up the Voice Assistant which helps visually impaired users. The rest is pretty much the same including the visibility and hearing enhancements, interaction and dexterity options. There are advanced accessibility options which allow you to set key combinations as shortcuts, set flash notifications (the camera flash or the screen flashes when you receive a notification), activate notification reminders, set voice labels to NFC tags. The last three groups of settings are the Software updates, User manual, and About phone.

Most recent reviews

A list of the most recent reviews of mobile devices made by us

Xiaomi Mi 9T/Redmi K20 Review

Xiaomi Mi 9T/Redmi K20 Review

Dimensions: 74.3 x 156.7 x 8.8 mm
Weight: 191 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 730
CPU: 2x 2.2 GHz Kryo 470, 6x 1.8 GHz Kryo 470, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 618
RAM: 6 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.39 in, Super AMOLED, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: MIUI Global 10.3.11 (Android 9.0 Pie)
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 30 fps

Samsung Galaxy A60 Review

Samsung Galaxy A60 Review

Dimensions: 73.9 x 155.2 x 7.9 mm
Weight: 169 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 675
CPU: 2x 2.0 GHz Kryo 460, 6x 1.7 GHz Kryo 460, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 612
RAM: 6 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, PLS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3500 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 6528 x 4896 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 30 fps

Xiaomi Mi A3 Review

Xiaomi Mi A3 Review

Dimensions: 71.85 x 153.48 x 8.48 mm
Weight: 173 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 665
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz Kryo 260, 4x 1.8 GHz Kryo 260, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 610
RAM: 4 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.09 in, AMOLED, 720 x 1560 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4030 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 30 fps

Ulefone Armor 6E Review

Ulefone Armor 6E Review

Dimensions: 83 x 166 x 13.3 mm
Weight: 267 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P70
CPU: 4x 2.1 GHz ARM Cortex-A73, 4x 1.95 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G72 MP3, 900 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6.2 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Oukitel K12 Review

Oukitel K12 Review

Dimensions: 75.4 x 163.5 x 14.5 mm
Weight: 286 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P35 (MT6765)
CPU: 4x 2.3 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.8 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: PowerVR GE8320, 680 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 10000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Oukitel K9 Review

Oukitel K9 Review

Dimensions: 86.3 x 177.6 x 8.9 mm
Weight: 232 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P35 (MT6765)
CPU: 4x 2.3 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.8 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: PowerVR GE8320, 680 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 7.12 in, IPS, 1080 x 2244 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 6000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

OnePlus 7 Pro Review

OnePlus 7 Pro Review

Dimensions: 75.9 x 162.6 x 8.8 mm
Weight: 206 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
CPU: 1x 2.84 GHz Kryo 485, 3x 2.42 GHz Kryo 485, 4x 1.8 GHz Kryo 485
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 640
RAM: 6 GB, 8 GB, 12 GB, 2133 MHz
Storage: 128 GB, 256 GB
Display: 6.67 in, Fluid AMOLED, 1440 x 3120 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Oxygen 9.5.4 (Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 60 fps

Cubot Max 2 Review

Cubot Max 2 Review

Dimensions: 81.55 x 173.05 x 8.95 mm
Weight: 214 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P22 (MT6762)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.5 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: PowerVR GE8320, 650 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 933 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6.8 in, IPS, 640 x 1352 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 3968 x 2976 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

UMIDIGI S3 Pro Review

UMIDIGI S3 Pro Review

Dimensions: 74.65 x 157 x 8.5 mm
Weight: 216 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P70
CPU: 4x 2.1 GHz ARM Cortex-A73, 4x 1.95 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G72 MP3, 900 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1800 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5150 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Pro Review

Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Pro Review

Dimensions: 75.21 x 159.21 x 8.1 mm
Weight: 186 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 675
CPU: 2x 2.0 GHz Kryo 460, 6x 1.7 GHz Kryo 460, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 612
RAM: 4 GB, 6 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: MIUI V10.2 (Android 9.0 Pie)
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 30 fps

Xiaomi Mi 9 Review

Xiaomi Mi 9 Review

Dimensions: 74.67 x 157.5 x 7.61 mm
Weight: 173 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
CPU: 1x 2.84 GHz Kryo 485, 3x 2.42 GHz Kryo 485, 4x 1.8 GHz Kryo 485
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 640
RAM: 6 GB, 8 GB, 2133 MHz
Storage: 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.39 in, Super AMOLED, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3300 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: MIUI V10.2 (Android 9.0 Pie)
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 60 fps

Samsung Galaxy S10+ Exynos Review

Samsung Galaxy S10+ Exynos Review

Dimensions: 74.1 x 157.6 x 7.8 mm
Weight: 175 g
SoC: Samsung Exynos 9 9820
CPU: 2x 2.73 GHz Exynos M4, 2x 2.31 GHz ARM Cortex-A75, 4x 1.95 GHz ARM Cortex-A55
GPU: ARM Mali-G76 MP12, 720 MHz
RAM: 8 GB, 12 GB
Storage: 128 GB, 512 GB, 1024 GB
Display: 6.4 in, Dynamic AMOLED, 1440 x 3040 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4100 mAh, Li-Ion
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4032 x 3024 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 60 fps

Samsung Galaxy S10 Exynos Review

Samsung Galaxy S10 Exynos Review

Dimensions: 70.4 x 149.9 x 7.8 mm
Weight: 157 g
SoC: Samsung Exynos 9 9820
CPU: 2x 2.73 GHz Exynos M4, 2x 2.31 GHz ARM Cortex-A75, 4x 1.95 GHz ARM Cortex-A55
GPU: ARM Mali-G76 MP12, 720 MHz
RAM: 8 GB
Storage: 128 GB, 512 GB
Display: 6.1 in, Dynamic AMOLED, 1440 x 3040 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3400 mAh, Li-Ion
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4032 x 3024 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 60 fps

Doogee S90 with Night Vision Camera and Battery pack module review

Doogee S90 with Night Vision Camera and Battery pack module review

Dimensions: 80.7 x 168.5 x 14.1 mm
Weight: 300 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P60 (MT6771V)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A73, 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G72 MP3, 800 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1800 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.18 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5050 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Cubot X19 Review

Cubot X19 Review

Dimensions: 74.67 x 155.06 x 9.55 mm
Weight: 174 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P23 (MT6763T)
CPU: 4x 2.3 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.65 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G71 MP2, 770 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 5.93 in, IPS, 1080 x 2160 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Alldocube X Wi-Fi Тablet Review

Alldocube X Wi-Fi Тablet Review

Dimensions: 243.68 x 173.14 x 6.9 mm
Weight: 496 g
SoC: MediaTek MT8176
CPU: 2x 2.1 GHz ARM Cortex-A72, 4x 1.7 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 6
GPU: PowerVR GX6250, 650 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 933 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 10.5 in, Super AMOLED, 2560 x 1600 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 8000 mAh, Li-Ion
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 3264 x 2448 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

UMIDIGI F1 Review

UMIDIGI F1 Review

Dimensions: 74.3 x 156.9 x 8.8 mm
Weight: 186 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P60 (MT6771V)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A73, 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G72 MP3, 800 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1800 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5150 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 9.0 Pie
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Review

Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Review

Dimensions: 75.21 x 159.21 x 8.1 mm
Weight: 186 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 MSM8976 Plus
CPU: 4x 2.2 GHz Kryo 260, 4x 1.84 GHz Kryo 260, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 512
RAM: 3 GB, 4 GB, 6 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: MIUI V10.2 (Android 9.0 Pie)
Camera: 8000 x 6000 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 60 fps

Ulefone Armor 6 Review

Ulefone Armor 6 Review

Dimensions: 83 x 166 x 13.3 mm
Weight: 265 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P60 (MT6771)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A73, 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G72 MP3, 800 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1800 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.2 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Alldocube M8 Review

Alldocube M8 Review

Dimensions: 215 x 122.9 x 8.48 mm
Weight: 345 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio X27 (MT6797X)
CPU: 2x 2.6 GHz ARM Cortex-A72, 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.6 GHz ARM Cortex-A53
GPU: ARM Mali-T880 MP4, 875 MHz
RAM: 3 GB, 800 MHz
Storage: 32 GB
Display: 8 in, IPS, 1920 x 1200 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5500 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.0 Oreo
Camera: 2592 x 1944 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 15 fps

UMIDIGI One Max Review

UMIDIGI One Max Review

Dimensions: 75.6 x 156.8 x 8.35 mm
Weight: 205 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P23 (MT6763V)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.5 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G71 MP2, 700 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 128 GB
Display: 6.3 in, IPS, 720 x 1520 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 4150 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 3968 x 2976 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 15 fps

Doogee Y7 Plus Review

Doogee Y7 Plus Review

Dimensions: 76.1 x 160.4 x 9.4 mm
Weight: 191 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P25 (MT6757CD)
CPU: 4x 2.5 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.6 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-T880 MP2, 900 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6.18 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 5080 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.0 Oreo
Camera: 4608 x 3456 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Nokia X7 Review

Nokia X7 Review

Dimensions: 75.76 x 154.8 x 7.97 mm
Weight: 178 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 710
CPU: 2x 2.2 GHz Kryo 360, 6x 1.7 GHz Kryo 360, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 616, 500 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 6 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 64 GB, 128 GB
Display: 6.18 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3500 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 4032 x 3024 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 30 fps

Oukitel U23 Review

Oukitel U23 Review

Dimensions: 75.8 x 153.75 x 9.3 mm
Weight: 202 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P23 (MT6763V)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.5 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G71 MP2, 700 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6.18 in, IPS, 1080 x 2246 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3500 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 4576 x 3432 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Ulefone Power 5S Review

Ulefone Power 5S Review

Dimensions: 80.2 x 169.4 x 15.8 mm
Weight: 330 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P23 (MT6763V)
CPU: 4x 2.0 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.5 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G71 MP2, 700 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 6 in, IPS, 1080 x 2160 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 13000 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 5312 x 3984 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Ulefone Armor 3 Review

Ulefone Armor 3 Review

Dimensions: 79.2 x 164.8 x 18.15 mm
Weight: 364 g
SoC: MediaTek Helio P23 (MT6763T)
CPU: 4x 2.3 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 4x 1.65 GHz ARM Cortex-A53, Cores: 8
GPU: ARM Mali-G71 MP2, 770 MHz
RAM: 4 GB, 1600 MHz
Storage: 64 GB
Display: 5.7 in, IPS, 1080 x 2160 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 10300 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: Android 8.1 Oreo
Camera: 5312 x 3984 pixels, 1920 x 1080 pixels, 30 fps

Xiaomi Mi MIX 3 Review

Xiaomi Mi MIX 3 Review

Dimensions: 74.69 x 157.89 x 8.46 mm
Weight: 218 g
SoC: Qualcomm Snapdragon 845
CPU: 4x 2.8 GHz Kryo 385, 4x 1.8 GHz Kryo 385, Cores: 8
GPU: Qualcomm Adreno 630, 710 MHz
RAM: 6 GB, 8 GB, 10 GB, 1866 MHz
Storage: 128 GB, 256 GB
Display: 6.39 in, AMOLED, 1080 x 2340 pixels, 24 bit
Battery: 3200 mAh, Li-Polymer
OS: MIUI V10 (Android 8.1 Oreo)
Camera: 4032 x 3024 pixels, 3840 x 2160 pixels, 60 fps